About Me

osuwheat

osuwheat

Since 2004 I have served as the Small Grains Extension Specialist at Oklahoma State University. I work to improve the profitability and sustainability of small grains production in the southern Great Plains through improved management and variety selection. Most of my work focuses on dual-purpose and grain-only wheat production.

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Fall armyworm on the march!

by: Tom Royer, OSU Extension Entomologist

Fall armyworms are active this fall. I checked a field of wheat this past weekend with significant damage from fall armyworms that averaged 6-7 fall armyworms per square foot. Scout for fall armyworms by examining plants in several (5 or more) locations in the field. Fall armyworms are most active in the morning or late afternoon. Look for “window paned” leaves and count all sizes of larvae.

Fall armyworm damage is characterized by window panning on wheat leaves. Injury can sometimes be greater in field margins as armyworms sometimes move in from adjacent road ditches or weedy areas.

Fall armyworm damage is characterized by window panning on wheat leaves. Injury can sometimes be greater in field margins as armyworms sometimes move in from adjacent road ditches or weedy areas.

Fall armyworms are generally most active early in the morning or late in the evening. Spray when 2-3 armyworms per linear foot of row are present.

Fall armyworms are generally most active early in the morning or late in the evening. Spray when 2-3 armyworms per linear foot of row are present.

Examine plants along the field margin as well as in the interior, because they sometimes move in from road ditches and weedy areas. The caterpillars were widely distributed in the field that I checked, suggesting that they were the result of a large egg lay from a recent adult moth flight. The suggested treatment threshold is 2-3 larvae per linear foot of row in wheat with active feeding. We won’t get relief from fall armyworms until we get a killing frost, since they do not overwinter in Oklahoma.

Consult the newly updated OSU Fact Sheet CR-7194 Management of Insect and Mite Pests of Small Grains for control suggestions.

Wheat protein report – 2014

This blog post contains information from OSU Current Report 2135 Protein Content of Winter Wheat Varieties in Oklahoma. A complete pdf version of the report with a brief explanation of sampling procedures can be found at www.wheat.okstate.edu.

The grass always seems to be greener on the other side when it comes to wheat protein. In a low protein year, everyone is scrambling to find higher protein wheat to blend. In a high protein year, such as this one, the same low protein wheat that was considered marginally acceptable the year before might command a slight premium. While wheat protein is important to end users, wheat protein is just one of many attributes which determine end-use quality and marketability of winter wheat. In fact, some millers and bakers would argue that functionality of wheat protein is more important than the quantity of protein. While varietal differences commonly exist, differences in wheat protein among environments are generally much larger than differences among varieties. Factors such as nitrogen fertility and drought stress, for example, can sharply impact final protein content of the grain, and most producers are better served focusing on good agronomic practices than slight genetic differences in wheat protein content.

To reflect environmental impacts on wheat grain protein content, 2014 wheat variety test data are reported by variety and location in Table 1. The 18.5% average wheat grain protein for the Thomas location is a good example of how fertility and environment can impact protein content. Soil tests at the time of sowing revealed 141 lb/acre of residual nitrogen available, which should be enough to produce a 70 bu/acre wheat crop. Due to extreme drought, however, average grain yield at Thomas was 13 bu/acre. Under these circumstances, wheat plants were able to pull large amounts of nitrogen from the soil and move this nitrogen to the developing grain. Grain size was reduced and grains were shriveled due to drought, thus resulting in abnormally high wheat protein. A similar situation was reported for Altus in 2013.

In Table 2 we reported the wheat grain protein content as a deviation from location mean for each variety, as this provides easier comparison of wheat grain protein among varieties across locations. Billings, for example, is a variety with solidly positive deviation from location means, indicating it has a tendency for above-average grain protein content. Iba, on the other hand, has negative deviations from location means, indicating a tendency for lower than average grain protein content. Adequate nitrogen fertility as recommended by a recent soil test or sensor-based nitrogen management program can help ensure that varieties such as Iba produce grain protein within the acceptable range for end-use customers. Iba is also a prime example of how protein data can sometimes be misused, as the functionality of the protein in Iba is above average, which can offset lower absolute grain protein content.

How to make $100,000 in a day

No, this blog post is not about a get rich quick scheme, but there is a way for the average wheat farmer in the southern Great Plains to add $50,000 to $100,000 to the bottom line in a single day. Most soil tests I have pulled this summer have shown 50 to 90 lb/ac of NO3-N in the top 18 inches of soil. Ninety pounds of N equates to about $45 of N fertilizer, and this knowledge could save a 2,500 acre wheat farmer in excess of $100,000 in fertilizer cost. Soil testing is laborious, but the potential economic returns for spending a day or two soil sampling are outstanding.

There is still time to soil sample. Soil samples only take a few days to process once they are in the OSU lab. It is not unusual for transit time to the lab to the slowest part of the process, so if you need a fast turnaround a trip to drop samples in the Ag Hall basement in Stillwater will help (plus you have probably been wanting cheese fries). If you have already applied pre-plant fertilizer or sown wheat, there is still time to assess soil N availability and uptake via the N-Rich Strip. In its simplest form, the N-rich strip is an area where N is not limiting. Either by visual assessment or with the assistance of an optical sensor, you can use the N-rich strip to determine your top dress N requirement, but you must create the N-rich strip this fall.

Soil testing is not always easy, but it is time well spent. My high school shop teacher would have labeled me a "Primitive Pete" for this photo.

Soil testing is not always easy, but it is time well spent. My high school shop teacher would have labeled me a “Primitive Pete” for this photo.

The bottom line is that a day of soil testing or putting out N-rich strips is well worth your time investment. On another note, how would you like to make money and improve your health at the same time? I have a multi-level marketing opportunity that I can get you in on the ground floor, but don’t tell anyone else. I can only make this deal for you and only today. There will be a small “buy in” fee that you will need to pay cash up front, though.

Partial funding for the research included in this blog post was provided by USDA Project No.2012-02355 through the National Institute for Food and Agriculture’s Agriculture and Food Research Initiative, Regional Approaches for Adaptation to and Mitigation of Climate Variability and Change

Planting wheat in hot soils

Kickoff of the college football season and the start of wheat planting are Labor Day traditions in the southern Great Plains. Many producers are waiting to see if rain forecasted for this weekend materializes, but it is likely that forage-based wheat farmers will start sowing wheat next week whether it rains or not. This means sowing wheat into hot soil conditions which can cause wheat germination and emergence issues. Given the potential problems, there are a few questions producers should ask themselves prior to planting into soil temperatures >90F.

coleoptile length

If the wheat coleoptile does not break the soil surface, the germinating wheat plant will not survive.

Will you have to plant deep to reach moisture? That first structure protruding from a germinating wheat seed is actually not a leaf. It is the coleoptile. The wheat coleoptile is a rigid structure whose sole purpose is to “punch through” the soil surface so that the first true leaf emerges above the soil surface. If this does not happen, the first true leaf will try to extend below the soil surface, turn yellow, and take on an accordion-like appearance (picture above). Modern semi-dwarf wheat varieties have shorter coleoptiles than older, tall wheat varieties and coleoptile length is shortened even further by hot soil conditions. So it is important to plant a variety with a longer coleoptile length (e.g. Garrison or Doans) if planting deeply into hot soils. A rating of coleoptile lengths for wheat varieties can be found in OSU Fact Sheet 2141 OSU Wheat Variety Comparison Chart available at www.wheat.okstate.edu or at the direct link to the publication here.

Is the variety high temperature germination sensitive? High temperature germination sensitivity is a fancy way of saying that some wheat varieties simply don’t germinate well in hot soil conditions (e.g. 2174, Overley). The extent of the sensitivity varies by year, so Overley might germinate fine in 95F soils one year and produce a 10% stand in the same soil conditions the next. When sowing early, it is best to plant varieties that do not have high temperature germination sensitivity (e.g. Duster, Gallagher, or Armour). Soil conditions generally cool due to lower ambient temperatures or cooling rains by about September 20; however our summer temperatures seem to be arriving late this year, so it is best to know the level of germination sensitivity in the variety you are planting. A rating of high temperature germination sensitivity for wheat varieties can be found in the variety comparison chart linked above. A more detailed explanation of the phenomenon can be found in OSU Fact Sheet PSS 2256 Factors affecting wheat germination and stand establishment in hot soils (available by clicking here).

Partial funding for the research included in this blog post was provided by USDA Project No.2012-02355 through the National Institute for Food and Agriculture’s Agriculture and Food Research Initiative, Regional Approaches for Adaptation to and Mitigation of Climate Variability and Change

Agriculture Policy News: supplemental coverage option (SCO) for winter wheat

Agriculture Policy News is written by Dr. Jody Campiche, OSU Extension Economist. You can find more of her newsletters at http://agecon.okstate.edu/agpolicy/index.asp?type=newsletters

 

The new Supplemental Coverage Option (SCO), available through the federal crop insurance program, will be available for corn, cotton, grain sorghum, rice, soybeans, spring barley, spring wheat, and winter wheat in selected counties for the 2015 crop year. The first enrollment deadline is September 30, 2014 for winter wheat. Producers will have the option to purchase SCO through a crop insurance agent along with their underlying individual insurance policy.

SCO is designed to cover county-wide losses and complement a producers’ individual insurance policy which is a new concept as producers have not previously been allowed to stack insurance policies for the same crop. To be eligible to purchase SCO, producers must also have an individual policy for the crop enrolled in SCO. The individual policy can be a Revenue Protection (RP) policy, a Revenue Protection with Harvest Price Exclusion (RP-HPE) policy, or a Yield Protection (YP) policy. SCO coverage is tied to the individual yield or revenue insurance policy. So a producer with an individual Yield Protection (YP) policy would only have the option to purchase an SCO yield protection policy (as opposed to a revenue protection policy). SCO will cover losses from 86% minus the coverage level of the producer’s individual policy. For example, if a producer has a 70% RP policy, the SCO coverage level would be 16% (86% – 70%). As shown in the figure below, SCO is only offered in certain counties/states for 2015 winter wheat and spring wheat crops.

 

 

For Oklahoma, the list of counties with 2015 winter wheat coverage and the SCO expected county yields are shown in the table below.

SCO Expected County Yield
Alfalfa 35.3 Jackson 27.2
Beaver 27.3 Kay 30.6
Beckham 21.7 Kingfisher 30.2
Blaine 27.5 Kiowa 26.7
Caddo 30.5 Logan 31.3
Canadian 30.9 Major 30.3
Cimarron 20.7 McClain 31.7
Comanche 23.7 Noble 25.4
Cotton 24.0 Oklahoma 33.2
Custer 28.5 Ottawa 33.1
Dewey 26.5 Payne 26.5
Ellis 21.5 Roger Mills 24.5
Garfield 33.2 Texas 33.5
Garvin 31.9 Tillman 26.2
Grady 28.1 Wagoner 31.7
Grant 32.5 Washita 27.6
Greer 24.2 Woods 31.8
Harmon 26.6 Woodward 26.5
Harper 25.4

Enrollment in the new Price Loss Coverage (PLC) and Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) programs through the Farm Service Agency (FSA) are now tied to enrollment in the SCO crop insurance program. The USDA Risk Management Agency (RMA) just released rules/guidelines for the SCO program but the Farm Service Agency (FSA) has not released rules/guidelines for ARC and PLC. Therefore, the information provided in this blog post is based on my current (08/11/2014) understanding of the interaction between these programs and could change once all final program details are released.

 

Producers who elect to participate in ARC are not eligible for SCO for the crop/farm number participating in ARC. Enrollment in ARC or PLC occurs on an FSA crop/farm number basis. Producers cannot receive benefits for both ARC and SCO on the same acreage/farm number of a crop. SCO is elected on crop/county basis so producers will need to report which acreage/farm numbers are enrolled in SCO and which acreage/farm numbers are enrolled in ARC.

 

The ARC/PLC decision is a one-time decision that will remain in effect for the life of the farm bill. Producers will likely enroll in ARC/PLC in late 2014 or early 2015. The initial ARC/PLC enrollment is for the 2014 crop year (although it may not take place until 2015). SCO is not available for the 2014 crop year. SCO is available for certain crops/counties for the 2015-2018 crop years. The SCO election will take place each crop year when a producer enrolls in an individual RP, RP-HPE, or YP policy. A producer who enrolls a crop/farm number in ARC will not have the option to purchase SCO for that crop/farm number for any of the 2015-2018 crop years. The deadline to enroll in SCO for winter wheat for the 2015 crop year is September 30, 2014.

 

For ARC and PLC, producers enroll base acres (with the exception of generic or cotton base acreage) but producers enroll planted acres in SCO. So, a producer could enroll base acreage of one crop in ARC on a particular farm number but plant a different crop on the same farm number and enroll that crop in SCO.

For example, assume Producer Jones has 100 base acres of grain sorghum on FSA farm number 1111 and 100 base acres of wheat on FSA farm number 2222:

Scenario 1: Producer Jones plants 100 acres of wheat on farm 1111 and 100 acres of wheat on farm 2222 during the 2015 crop year. Here are some available options:

  • Farm 1111
    1. Enroll the grain sorghum base acreage in PLC, option to purchase SCO on planted wheat acres for the 2015 crop year (and through 2018)
    2. Enroll the grain sorghum base acreage in ARC, option to purchase SCO on planted wheat acres for the 2015 crop year (and through 2018)
  • Farm 2222
    1. Enroll the wheat base acreage in PLC, option to purchase SCO on planted wheat acres for the 2015 crop year (and through 2018)
    2. Enroll the wheat base acreage in ARC, CANNOT purchase SCO on planted wheat acres in any year

Scenario 2: Producer Jones plants 100 acres of grain sorghum on farm 1111, 50 acres of wheat on farm 2222, and 50 acres of canola on farm 2222. Here are some available options:

  • Farm 1111
    1. Enroll the grain sorghum base acreage in PLC, option to purchase SCO on planted grain sorghum acres for the 2015 crop year (and through 2018)
    2. Enroll the grain sorghum base acreage in ARC, CANNOT purchase SCO on planted grain sorghum acres for the 2015 crop year (and through 2018)
  • Farm 2222
    1. Enroll the wheat base acreage in PLC, option to purchase SCO on planted wheat acres, CANNOT purchase SCO on the planted canola acres for the 2015 crop year since SCO is not available for canola in 2015 (may have the option to purchase SCO for canola in some counties in 2016-2018, but this is uncertain)
    2. Enroll the wheat base acreage in ARC, CANNOT purchase SCO on the planted wheat acres in any year, CANNOT purchase SCO on the planted canola acres for the 2015 crop year since SCO is not available for canola in 2015 (may have the option to purchase SCO for canola in certain counties in 2016-2018)

 

Since producers will likely not be able to enroll in ARC or PLC prior to the Sept. 30 deadline for SCO coverage on 2015 winter wheat, SCO coverage can be withdrawn on any farm where producers intend to elect ARC for winter wheat by the earlier of their acreage reporting date or Dec. 15, without penalty. This allows producers additional time to make an informed decision between ARC or PLC for winter wheat. If producers withdraw SCO coverage for a farm by the earlier of their acreage reporting date or Dec. 15, they will not be charged a crop insurance premium. In order to withdraw coverage without penalty, producers must notify their crop insurance agent of their intended election for ARC by the earlier of their winter wheat acreage reporting date or Dec. 15. The option to withdraw SCO coverage will only be allowed for the 2015 crop year for fall planted wheat.

 

A producer who chooses to purchase an SCO policy has several options. The producer could keep the previous coverage level on the individual RP, RP-HPE, or YP policy and add SCO coverage. As an example, if a producer has a 70% RP policy, the producer could buy 16% SCO coverage (86%-70%). The producer could also decide to lower the coverage level on the individual policy and add more SCO coverage. For example, the producer could lower RP coverage to 60% and buy 26% SCO coverage (86%-60%). However, it is important to note that if a producer decides to withdraw from SCO later this year (due to enrollment in ARC), the producer would not be able to change the coverage level of the underlying policy for the 2015 crop year. For example, assume a producer usually purchases a 70% RP policy on wheat. If the producer decides to lower RP coverage to 60% and purchase 26% SCO coverage (86%-60%) for the 2015 crop year, but then decides to withdraw from SCO, the producer would not be able to change the 60% RP coverage for the 2015 crop year.

 

Due to the complexity of decisions related to ARC, PLC, SCO, and individual insurance policies, producers should consider several factors. Some of the key points to think about are:

  1. What level of coverage does the producer currently have on the individual policy?
    • SCO only provides coverage up to 86% so a producer with an 85% RP policy may not want SCO coverage (although the producer could lower the coverage on the individual policy and buy more SCO coverage
  2. Is SCO offered for the crop/county in 2015 and/or later years?
    • RMA may add additional crops/counties for the 2016 crop year.
  3. Does the producer currently have enterprise units on the underlying individual crop insurance policy? If so, the producer may want to examine the marginal costs of increased coverage on the underlying policy as opposed to adding SCO coverage.
    • Enterprise units would cover losses closer to the individual farm-level than county-level SCO coverage (may cost less than SCO depending on coverage level).
  4. SCO covers losses at the county-level while an RP, RP-HPE, or YP policy covers losses at the farm level. If a farm-level loss occurs but a county-level loss does not occur, SCO would not pay an indemnity. If a farm-level loss does not occur but a county-level loss does occur, SCO would pay an indemnity.
  5. What is the cost of the underlying individual crop insurance policy?
    • Can the producer obtain higher levels of coverage on the individual policy at affordable rates? If not, SCO could provide a higher level of coverage at a more affordable rate. The SCO premium subsidy is 65% compared to a 59% subsidy for a 70% RP policy (the subsidy varies for other levels of coverage on an individual policy).
  6. Does the producer want to enroll in ARC for a particular crop/farm number? If so, SCO is not an option for the same crop/farm number.
  7. Does the producer want to have the option to purchase SCO for a crop/farm number in a later year (after the 2015 crop year)? If so, the crop/farm number cannot be enrolled in ARC.
  8. Does the producer want to have more time to think about SCO for the 2015 winter wheat crop? If so, the producer may want to obtain SCO coverage for winter wheat prior to the Sept. 30 deadline and withdraw later if enrolling in ARC.

 

 

 

For additional information:

SCO Endorsement: http://www.rma.usda.gov/policies/2015/15sco.pdf

SCO Underwriting Standards Handbook: http://www.rma.usda.gov/handbooks/18000/2015/15_18180.pdf

 

2014 Wheat Crop Overview

This blog post is an excerpt from the 2014 OSU Small Grains Variety Performance Tests report, which is available at http://www.wheat.okstate.edu or by clicking here.

At the time of writing this post, 2014 Oklahoma wheat production is estimated to be approximately 51 million bushels, which is roughly half of 2013 production (Table 1). Oklahoma has not seen wheat production this low since the 43 million bushel crop of 1957, and with any luck, production will not be this low again for at least another 60 years.

 

Table 1. Oklahoma wheat production for 2013 and 2014 as estimated by OK NASS, July 2014
2013 2014
Harvested Acres 3.4 million 3.0 million
Yield (bu/ac) 31 17
Total bushels 105 million 51 million

 

The 2013-2014 wheat production season had a good start in central Oklahoma. Topsoil moisture was short in September, but October rains resulted in favorable conditions for wheat emergence and establishment. In addition, many areas had a fair amount of stored soil moisture from the summer of 2013. This stored soil moisture allowed sites such as Chickasha and Lahoma to produce 43 and 47 bu/ac average wheat yield on less than eight inches of rainfall during the growing season. Stored soil moisture also contributed to adequate forage production at grazed sites such as Marshall Dual-Purpose, but production of a forage crop did not leave behind enough moisture to fuel much of a grain crop.

 

The multi-year drought never released its stranglehold on western Oklahoma during the 2013-2014 wheat production season. Small rains here or there allowed most producers to obtain an acceptable stand of wheat, but moisture was never sufficient to spur tillering or leaf area development. Early winter snowfall made for a few bright spots for forage production in southwestern Oklahoma, but this moisture was quickly utilized by growing wheat plants and dry conditions soon returned. As a result, many fields in southwestern and western Oklahoma were abandoned and not taken to harvest.

This photo of a wheat field near Altus, Oklahoma in April 2014 shows the level of devastation from the extreme, multi-year drought. Most wheat fields in this region were abandoned due to drought.

This photo of a wheat field near Altus, Oklahoma in April 2014 shows the level of devastation from the extreme, multi-year drought. Most wheat fields in this region were abandoned due to drought.

 

Thin wheat stands left some fields vulnerable to blowing sand and wind erosion

Thin wheat stands left some fields vulnerable to blowing sand and wind erosion

The winter of 2013-2014 wasn’t just dry; it was cold too. Young, drought-stressed wheat plants had difficulty dealing with the cold, windy conditions, and winterkill was common in late-sown wheat. Winterkill was also common in grazed wheat that was stressed by heavy grazing pressure and inadequate soil moisture. Considerable winterkill was also present in no-till wheat without adequate seed to soil contact in northwestern Oklahoma. The inadequate seed to soil contact was generally the result of heavy residue from the previous year’s wheat crop.

Winterkill was common in northwestern Oklahoma, with the greatest injury occurring in no-till and/or grazed wheat fields.

Winterkill was common in northwestern Oklahoma, with the greatest injury occurring in no-till and/or grazed wheat fields.

Closer inspection of some no-till fields with winterkill revealed shallow seed placement due to heavy and/or unevenly spread residue from the 2103 wheat crop.

Closer inspection of some no-till fields with winterkill revealed shallow seed placement due to heavy and/or unevenly spread residue from the 2103 wheat crop.

 

While the wheat crop did not appear to be on its way to bumper production, most producers hoped for a turnaround similar to 2013 and topdressed in late winter. Unlike the spring of 2013, however, the rains never came and much of this topdress N applied did not make it into the soil until the crop was at boot stage or later.

 

The cold winter delayed the onset of first hollow stem by about five days as compared to 2013 and 25 days as compared to 2012. Despite a slow start to the spring, wheat in southern Oklahoma was near heading when a hard freeze occurred the morning of April 15, 2014. As expected, drought stressed wheat in advanced stages in southwestern Oklahoma suffered severe freeze damage; however, injury from the 2014 spring freeze did not always follow the “rule of thumb” guidelines used by agronomists. Many areas that received small amounts of rain just prior to the freeze seemed to escape widespread injury, regardless of growth stage. In southcentral Oklahoma, injury seemed to be most severe on later maturing varieties that were approximately Feekes GS 7 to booting, while earlier-maturing varieties that were just starting to head escaped freeze injury. Wheat that was barely past two nodes in northern Oklahoma suffered severe injury, while more advanced wheat in central Oklahoma endured similar temperatures with minimal injury.

 

There were relatively few insect or disease issues to deal with during the 2013-2014 wheat production season. Winter grain mite and/or brown wheat mite infestations proved to be too much for some drought stressed wheat fields in northcentral and northwestern Oklahoma. Some fields already devastated by the drought were left unsprayed, while others still showing some sign of yield potential were treated.

 

Injury, such as the bronzed areas in the picture above, was the result of brown wheat mite and/or winter grain mite infestations in late winter.

Injury, such as the bronzed areas in the picture above, was the result of brown wheat mite and/or winter grain mite infestations in late winter.

 

Other than a rare siting of a single leaf rust pustule, there was no foliar disease in Oklahoma in 2014. The lack of foliar disease is evidenced by the lack of response to foliar fungicides at either Chickasha or Lahoma. These two sites provided a rare opportunity in 2014 to observe yield impacts of foliar fungicides in the absence of disease, as most years we report at least light or negligible foliar disease at these sites. While foliar disease was not an issue in 2014, wheat streak mosaic virus was an issue for many producers. This disease has historically been most prevalent in northwestern Oklahoma and the Panhandle. Wheat streak mosaic virus was confirmed in several fields downstate this year, however, and it is likely that some fields affected by wheat streak mosaic virus were not identified as such because it is sometimes difficult to distinguish wheat streak mosaic virus symptoms from those of severe drought stress. The wheat variety testing program was not immune from this disease, and we lost our Kildare location to wheat streak mosaic virus.

 

Warmer temperatures in May hastened crop maturity and the Oklahoma wheat harvest began near Frederick on May 22, 2014. By the first week of June, harvest was in full swing, only to be delayed by rain shortly thereafter. Harvest resumed across most of the state by June 13 and was mostly completed by June 30. The exceptions being some waterlogged areas in northern Oklahoma. The Cherokee Mesonet site, for example, reported 5.1 inches of rainfall from October 1, 2013 to May 31, 2014, but the same site received 10 inches of rain from June 1 to June 30, 2014.

Harvest underway

The 2014 Oklahoma wheat harvest is underway and results from the Walters and Thomas wheat variety trials are now posted at http://www.wheat.okstate.edu. Depending on field operations, I usually get variety trial results posted on the web within a day or two of harvest.  The best way to learn when results are posted are to follow me on Twitter @OSU_smallgrains or subscribe to our Extension news list serve (send me an email at jeff.edwards@okstate.edu to be added to the listserv).

I have posted a few pics from our harvest operations below.

 

Wheat checkoff dollars make the Oklahoma Wheat Variety Testing program possible. We appreciate the support of our Oklahoma farmers!

Wheat checkoff dollars make the Oklahoma Wheat Variety Testing program possible. We appreciate the support of our Oklahoma farmers!

Harvest at Walters, OK. Photo courtesy Todd Johnson, OSU Ag. Comm. Services.

Harvest at Walters, OK. Photo courtesy Todd Johnson, OSU Ag. Comm. Services.

Changing tires on the side of I-35 is never fun. We blew two more on the way to Thomas the next day and damaged the trailer. Big shout out to Eley's service center in Watonga and Watonga  Machine and Steel for getting us back on the road. Don't get me started on the lack of American made trailer tires!

Changing tires on the side of I-35 is never fun. We blew two more on the way to Thomas the next day and damaged the trailer. Big shout out to Eley’s service center in Watonga and Watonga Machine and Steel for getting us back on the road.

Once we made it Thomas harvest went well. Yields were low, but that was to be expected given the freeze and drought.

Once we made it Thomas harvest went well. Yields were low, but that was to be expected given the freeze and drought.

Banding P as a Band-Aid for low-pH soils.

osuwheat:

Great post!

Originally posted on Down and Dirty with NPK:

In the mid-1970s Dr. Robert Westerman banded 18-46-0 with wheat at planting in a low-pH soil near Haskel Ok. The impact was immediately evident. Soon after Oklahoma State University recommended the “Banding of Phosphate in Wheat: A Temporary Alternative to Liming” Figure 1. This method was a Band-Aid solution for the significant amount Oklahoma winter wheat production area which was either too far from a reliable lime source or under a short term lease contract.

Figure 1. The cover of an extension brochure distributed in Oklahoma during the 1980s.

Figure 1. The cover of an extension brochure distributed in Oklahoma during the 1980s.

Still today grain producers throughout the United States commonly farm a large percentage of land that is not their own. In the leasing process agreements can widely vary both on length of the lease and the amount of inputs that the land owner will pay. The wheat belt of Oklahoma is known for having large areas with low soil pH levels…

View original 1,199 more words

Questions about Clearfield wheat

The introduction of two-gene Clearfield technology and the release of an Oklahoma-developed two-gene Clearfield wheat variety have resulted in increased interest in the Clearfield system in the southern Great Plains. This has also resulted in several questions, some of which I will attempt to answer in this blog post. If you have specific questions regarding rates, timings, etc., I encourage you to contact your local BASF representative.

Are Clearfield wheat varieties GMO’s? No. The Clearfield system is a non-genetically modified crop herbicide tolerance technology.

What is two-gene technology and what does it mean? As the name implies, two gene Clearfield varieties have two copies of the gene that confers resistance to imidazolinone herbicides. Two gene varieties have “Plus” or “+” in the name (e.g. Doublestop CL Plus). In wheat two-gene technology provides the option of adding 1% v/v methylated seed oil (MSO) to the spray solution. In my experience, addition of 1% v/v MSO greatly increases Beyond efficacy on feral rye. Methylated seed oil should NOT be added to the spray solution for one-gene Clearfield varieties, as crop injury will occur.

What is the new OSU two-gene Clearfield variety? Doublestop CL Plus was released by OSU in 2013 and is marketed through Oklahoma Genetics Inc. It is a late to first hollow stem and late maturity (about the same as Endurance) variety with a wide area of adaptation. A few of the strengths of Doublestop CL Plus include yield potential, acid soil tolerance, test weight, and milling and baking characteristics. More information on Doublestop CL Plus can be found by clicking here.

Doublestop CL Plus

Can I save seed from Clearfield varieties? No. The gene that confers the Clearfield trait is protected by a utility patent and new seed (registered or certified) must be purchased each year.

Can I grow a Clearfield variety two years in a row? The better question might be should you grow a Clearfield variety two years in a row? Multiple years of using the same herbicide or herbicide mode of action can result in herbicide resistance. Of particular concern is jointed goatgrass, which has the ability to hybridize with wheat. This ability to hybridize could result in a population of resistant jointed goatgrass in a fairly short time period. So, if jointed goatgrass is the primary weed problem, rotating crops and/or herbicide chemistries to avoid consecutive years of Clearfield technology is a good stewardship practice.

Other grasses, such as feral rye, do not have the potential to hybridize, but the potential for weed resistance is still there through selection pressure. In these situations, I would not be as concerned about two consecutive years of a Clearfield system, but would certainly switch herbicide chemistry for a year after that.

Ultimately, it is important to rotate crops and herbicide modes of action to ensure the longevity of the Clearfield system. Weed resistance is bad and it is worse if your farm is the epicenter of the problem. Clearfield stewardship guidelines are available from BASF by clicking here

 

 

2013-2014 Wheat fall forage variety trial results

This blog post is an abbreviated posting of our wheat forage results. For the complete report, consult OSU Current Report 2141 Fall forage production and date of first hollow stem in winter wheat varieties during the 2013-2014 crop year by clicking here.

Average daily temperature and rainfall for Stillwater, OK from 09/01/2013 to 03/31/2014

Average daily temperature and rainfall for Stillwater, OK from 09/01/2013 to 03/31/2014

Average daily temperature and rainfall for Chickasha, OK from 09/01/2013 to 03/31/2014

Average daily temperature and rainfall for Chickasha, OK from 09/01/2013 to 03/31/2014

As was the case across most of Oklahoma, our wheat plots were sown into dry topsoil in late September. Soils in southwest and northwest Oklahoma were extremely dry due to multiple years of drought, and wheat pasture was short in these areas of the state. Summer rainfall provided ample subsoil moisture in the central part of the state, but topsoil was largely dry through September. Rains fell across much of the state in October and provided the fuel needed to build wheat pasture. Unfortunately, these October rains would be the only significant rainfall events most of the Oklahoma wheat crop would receive .

 

Fall forage production by winter wheat at Stillwater and Chickasha averaged 3,240 and 2,580 pounds per acre, respectively (Tables below). There was a large group of varieties at Stillwater and Chickasha that produced statistically equivalent forage yield, and producers are encouraged to consider two and three year averages when available.

 

 

Table 2. Fall forage production by winter wheat varieties at Stillwater, OK during the 2013-2014 production year.
Source Variety  2013-2014  2-Year  3-Year
 —————lbs dry forage/acre—————-
Syngenta SY Llano 4,100 - -
AGSECO TAM 113 4,090 3,160 3,220
OGI Billings 3,850 3,200 3,250
LCS LCS Mint 3,690 - -
OGI Duster 3,670 3,180 3,300
OGI Gallagher 3,650 3,230 3,500
LCS T154 3,640 3,040 -
Syngenta Doans 3,610 - -
WestBred WB4458 3,610 2,920 -
Syngenta Jackpot 3,600 3,060 3,150
WestBred WB-Cedar 3,560 3,240 3,250
OSU Deliver 3,470 2,770 3,010
WestBred Winterhawk 3,470 2,780 3,020
OGI Garrison 3,350 3,100 3,210
Watley TAM 112 3,230 - -
OGI Doublestop CL Plus 3,200 3,020 -
OGI Pete 3,160 2,810 3,020
Syngenta CJ 3,130 2,810 2,980
LCS LCH08-80 3,120 2,950 -
WestBred Armour 3,110 3,000 3,100
LCS LCH11-1117 3,110 - -
OGI Centerfield 3,090 2,820 3,120
OGI OK Bullet 3,090 2,630 2,820
Syngenta SY Southwind 3,090 - -
OSU Endurance 3,080 3,080 3,310
KWA Everest 3,050 2,810 3,010
Syngenta Greer 3,040 2,840 2,960
LCS LCH11-1130 3,040 - -
LCS T158 3,020 2,760 3,000
CWRF Brawl CL Plus 2,980 2,860 -
OGI Ruby Lee 2,980 2,610 2,900
LCS T153 2,960 2,840 3,090
OGI Iba 2,930 2,770 3,030
WestBred WB-Grainfield 2,910 2,920 -
WestBred WB-Redhawk 2,850 2,590 -
LCS LCH11-109 2,750 2,990 -
OGI OK Rising 2,720 2,720 -
CWRF Byrd 2,670 2,590 -
OSU Experimentals
OK09125 2,800 2,540 -
LSD (0.05) 750 500 400

 

Table 3. Fall forage production by winter wheat varieties at Chickasha, OK during the 2013-2014 production year.
Source Variety 2013-2014  2-Year
–lbs dry forage/acre–
OGI Duster 2,920 2,920
OGI Gallagher 2,920 3,010
LCS T158 2,900 2,580
CWRF Brawl CL Plus 2,830 -
KWA Everest 2,750 2,750
OGI Doublestop CL Plus 2,700 -
WestBred Winterhawk 2,680 -
LCS LCS Mint 2,660 -
OSU Endurance 2,630 2,620
WestBred WB-Cedar 2,590 2,630
CWRF Byrd 2,540 -
Syngenta Jackpot 2,540 2,460
WB-Grainfield WB-Grainfield 2,530 -
WestBred WB4458 2,520 -
OGI Iba 2,460 2,460
LCS LCH08-80 2,440 -
OGI Billings 2,420 -
OGI Ruby Lee 2,420 2,430
OSU Deliver 2,410 2,200
Syngenta Greer 2,380 2,480
Syngenta Doans 2,210 -
OGI Garrison 2,160 2,220
OSU Experimentals
OK09125 2,760 -
Average 2,580 2,560
LSD 430 290

First hollow stem data are reported in ‘day of year’ (day) format (table below). To provide reference, keep in mind that March 1 is day 60. Average occurrence of first hollow stem at Stillwater in 2014 was day 77. This was approximately five days later than 2013 and 25 days later than in 2012 and was the result of much cooler than normal temperatures. Unlike previous years, there was only about ten days difference among varieties in occurrence of first hollow stem.

Table 4. Occurrence of first hollow stem (day of year) for winter wheat varieties sown in 2013 and measured in 2014 at Stillwater, OK
Source Variety Stillwater
–day of year–
Syngenta SY Llano 72
WestBred WB-Cedar 72
OGI Billings 74
Syngenta CJ 74
KWA Everest 74
OGI Gallagher 74
Syngenta Jackpot 74
OGI OK Bullet 74
OGI OK Rising 74
Syngenta SY Southwind 74
LCS T153 74
Watley TAM 112 74
AGSECO TAM 113 74
WestBred Armour 77
CWRF Byrd 77
OSU Deliver 77
Syngenta Doans 77
OGI Duster 77
OSU Endurance 77
OGI Garrison 77
Syngenta Greer 77
LCS LCH11-109 77
LCS LCH11-1117 77
LCS LCH11-1130 77
LCS LCS Wizard 77
OGI Pete 77
LCS T154 77
WestBred WB-Redhawk 77
WestBred WB4458 77
WestBred Winterhawk 77
OGI Doublestop CL Plus 80
OGI Iba 80
LCS LCS Mint 80
OGI Ruby Lee 80
LCS T158 80
WestBred WB-Grainfield 80
CWRF Brawl CL Plus 83
OGI Centerfield 83
OSU Experimentals
OK11754WF 69
OK10728W 74
OK09520 77
OK08707W-19C13 80
OK09125 83
OK10805W 83
OK10126 86
Average 77
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